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WILDLIFE CONSERVATION IN UGANDA DURING THE FIRST DECADE OF INDEPENDENCE

THEN IN KENYA UNTIL THE HUNTING BAN

BY CHRIS FIELD

WEDNESDAY, 7TH JUNE 2017

MUTHAIGA COUNTRY CLUB IN THE BALLROOM

East African Wild Life Society’s work in the protection of the region's biodiversity has received a handsome recognition from the estate of The Late Rosamaria Paasche in Norway. This is after the estate made a legacy donation of USD 400,000 according to the wishes of the reknowned conservationist who was born in El Savador and died in Oslo on 28th November 2016.

The donation was formally presented to the EAWLS Chairman Mr. Joe Kibe by the estate lawyer Mr. Arne Os at a cocktail ceremony held at the Residence of the Royal Norwegian Ambassador to Kenya. Present at the ceremony included H. E. the Norwegian Ambassador to Kenya Mr. Victor Ronneberg, EAWLS board members, EAWLS Executive Director Julius Kamau, invited conservation enthusiast and staff of EAWLS.

Mr. Os spoke of the late Paasche as a diligent philologist whose love for nature and its preservation was unmatched. For close to 5 decades Ms. Paasche devoted her time to working with and for nature across Africa and her birth continent of South America. He noted that the donation of half her entire estate to EAWLS was the utmost indication of how she followed the society’s work and how she drew inspiration from that work.

“It is her hope that this donation will go a long way to further boost the work of the East African Wild Life Society and champion a cause she dedicated a big part of her life to.

Speaking at the ceremony H. E. the Norwegian Ambassador to Kenya Mr. Victor Ronneberg noted that global climate change and loss of biodiversity are among the most serious environmental threats to the world at present. The ambassador highlighted the work Norway has been in several parts of the developing world to combat climate change through projects addressing food security, forests, clean energy and reducing emissions among other initiatives.

“Much of Norway’s development aid to East Africa has been channelled to local partners in key areas such as environment, energy, health and education. We are therefore happy to see Norwegian citizens complement our efforts in a big way by supporting local organizations working towards our shared mission.” The Ambassador added.

EAWLS Chairman Mr. Joe Kibe thanked he estate of the late Rosamaria Paasche for the immense support through the donation. While noting that the society’s work in conservation relied on the generosity of well-wishers, the chairman appealed to more individuals and institutions to partner with the society to maintain East Africa’s rich natural heritage and threatened species.

DOMESTIC DOGS, WILD DOGS, CHEETAHS AND RABIES VACCINATIONS:

WHAT WE NEED TO KNOW BY DEDAN KABUU NGATIA

WEDNESDAY, 21ST JUNE 2017

 KAREN COUNTRY CLUB – UPSTAIRS LOUNGE


image courtesy: Nat Geo

The wholesale price of raw ivory in China has fallen by almost two-thirds in the past three years, a new report unveiled today shows, noting that the Chinese government has during that time made increasingly strong commitment to close the domestic ivory trade.

China will on 31 March 2017 shut down all ivory factories in the country. All retail outlets will be closed by the end of this year.

According to the report by researchers Esmond Bradley Martin and Lucy Vigne for the conservation organisation, Save the Elephants, the average price of tusks was $2,100 per kg in early 2014, but by late 2015 it had fallen to $1,100 per kilo. The price decline continued, plummeting to $730 per kg in February 2017, according to the report entitled Decline in the Legal Ivory Trade in Anticipation of a Ban.

“Findings from 2015 and 2016 in China have shown that the legal ivory trade especially has been severely diminished,” said Ms Vigne. The 130 licensed outlets in China have been gradually reducing the quantity of ivory items on display for sale, and recently have been cutting prices to improve sales, according to the report.

The study gives several driving factors behind the decline in the wholesale prices for raw ivory in China. An economic slowdown has resulted in fewer people able to afford luxury goods, and a crackdown on corrupt is dissuading business people from buying expensive items as favours for government officials.

The Chinese government has also made strong commitments to close down the country’s legal ivory trade, and public awareness campaigns have exposed many potential buyers to the impact that buying ivory has on Africa’s elephants.

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